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    TAVR Procedure


    Did you miss our ad during the Big Game?

    Click below to see the heartwarming story of a WWII Veteran from Lenoir City.



    Click here to watch how TAVR (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement) changed the life of World War II veteran Beaulis Lively and helped make a longtime dream of his come true. Click here to hear more of Beaulis Lively’s story in his own words.


    The treatment for severe aortic stenosis for high risk and inoperable patients

    Covenant Health was the first entity in Knoxville to have surgeons trained in the TAVR procedure by Edwards Lifesciences. Dr. Mike Ayres, Dr. Thomas Pollard, Dr. Chadwick Stouffer, and Dr. Nicholoas Xenopoulos are Covenant Health’s first physicians to be trained in TAVR and they have performed more successful TAVR procedures to date than any other physician group in the area.

    Parkwest Medical Center is one of only 172 sites in the nation to offer TAVR. This procedure is performed only in Parkwest Medical Center’s state-of-the-art hybrid operating room by surgeons trained in the TAVR procedure by Edwards Lifesciences. These surgeons include Dr. Mike Ayres, Dr. Thomas Pollard, Dr. Chadwick Stouffer, and Dr. Nicholoas Xenopoulos (pictured below with cardiac anesthesiologist Dr. Lee Collins).

    Location:         Parkwest Valve Center
                            9330 Park West Blvd.
                            Physician’s Plaza, Suite 100
                            Knoxville, TN 37923

    Phone:              (865) 373-7942

    Please note that a referral from your regular physician or cardiologist is recommended, but not required.

    For decades, the only treatment for severe aortic stenosis (see bottom of page) was traditional open heart surgery, requiring a surgeon to create a large incision and divide the breast bone in order to replace the defective valve. Patients deemed inoperable or high risk were unable to undergo the potentially life-saving surgery. Today many of these patients can have the blocked valve replaced endovascularly using a small wire in a new procedure called Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement, or TAVR.

    If you have been diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis and have been deemed inoperable or too high risk for traditional surgery, you may be a candidate for the TAVR procedure. Please call the Parkwest Valve Center to make an appointment. A referral from your regular physician or cardiologist is recommended, but not required. 

     Click here for more information about our TAVR team.

    Click here for a complete list of Covenant Health cardiac physicians.

    A team of physicians was instrumental in the design of a “hybrid operating room” (seen in background) which combines the best of a traditional surgical suite with large, real-time imaging equipment in a ster¬ile setting. Pictured are some of the physicians who were involved the breakthrough TAVR procedure for patients who are medically unable to have open-heart surgery. L to R, Chadwick Stouffer M.D., Lee Collins M.D., Nicholaos Xenopoulos M.D., Mike Ayres M.D. and Thomas Pollard M.D.
    A team of physicians was instrumental in the design of a “hybrid operating room” (seen in background) which combines the best of a traditional surgical suite with large, real-time imaging equipment in a ster¬ile setting. Pictured are some of the physicians who were involved the breakthrough TAVR procedure for patients who are medically unable to have open-heart surgery. L to R, Chadwick Stouffer M.D., Lee Collins M.D., Nicholaos Xenopoulos M.D., Mike Ayres M.D. and Thomas Pollard M.D.


    In the United States, TAVR continues to be studied as part of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial which studied inoperable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Compared to standard medical care, among the inoperable patients who had TAVR, the procedure reduced their absolute risk of dying by 20 percent. The risk of mortality decreased from 50 percent to 30 percent.

    See below for a complete list of aortic stenosis and TAVR information resources, including the Parkwest Valve Center brochure, fact sheets, videos and patient success stories.











    Frequently Asked Questions:


    What is Aortic Stenosis?

    The condition in which leaflets of a calcified aortic valve are unable to open wide, obstructing blood flow from the left ventricle into the aorta is aortic stenosis The narrowed valve allows less blood to flow through and as a result, less oxygen-rich blood is pumped out to the body, which may cause symptoms like severe shortness of breath.  Read more

    How common is Aortic Stenosis and how does TAVR treat this condition?

    (See video covering this topic)

    Heart valve disease can occur in any single valve or a combination of the four valves, but diseases of the aortic and mitral valves are the most common, affecting more than five percent of the population. With the TAVR procedure, an artificial device (see SAPIEN valve, pictured below) opens the aortic heart valve wide to allow oxygen-rich blood to flow unobstructed in one direction. The blood flows through the valve into the aorta where it then flows out to the rest of the body. Read more

     Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve

    Tell me more about the Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve

    FDA-approved in November 2011, the Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve is the first biologic transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) therapy approved for use in the U.S. The artificial valve is designed to replace a patient’s diseased native aortic valve without traditional open-heart surgery and while the heart continues to beat – eliminating the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Read more
    Illustrations courtesy of Edwards Lifesciences.   

    What is the TAVR Heart Team?

    The partnership between the cardiac surgeon and interventional cardiologist establishes the core of the TAVR Heart Team – a care team comprised of specialists from various disciplines that work together to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This multi-disciplinary approach to patient care is essential in TAVR, as each specialist contributes an important area of expertise that plays an integral role in the collective care process. Read more

    Glossary of Cardiology Terms



    Patient Success Stories

    Roy Ogle's Story: July 2, 2012 and One Year Later: July 1, 2013 Robert Channell’s Story: July 29, 2013
    Roy Ogle's Story: July 2, 2012
    Roy Ogle One Year Later: July 1, 2013


      Robert Channell’s Story: July 29, 2013



    Beaulis Lively’s Story: Jan. 28, 2013 Ted Bernard’s Story: March 18, 2013
    Beaulis Lively’s Story: Jan. 28, 2013


    Ted Bernard’s Story: March 18, 2013


    Ray Rogers’ Story: April 22, 2013

    Jean Spach’s Story: June 3, 2013
    Ray Rogers’ Story: April 22, 2013


    Jean Spach’s Story: June 3, 2013